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I am curious your take on “gifted” programs at schools. Placement in these is usually determined by the achievements of a student, do you foreseeĀ a future where this is instead determined by ones potential? What are the implications on students without the best genetics if that were to be the case?

Potential is an extremely difficult thing to measure. Genes do not act in isolation and in fact interact with environments. For example, a student may have genetic potential to become a great musician, but this will only be actualized if they are exposed to or are able to seek a musically rich environment.
Achievement itself, and factors such as SES are themselves genetically influenced to some extent. Whilst there is the potential to use genetic information directly to identify those students who are more likely to do well at school, the important question is whether we direct resources to help those most in need, or those who are most able. It is a misconception that for societies to flourish we just need to foster talent. It is important to direct resources to tailor educational curricular to an individuals needs.
It is common in schools around the world to stream students into different abilities groups already, but this is done in quite a crude manner. Genetics has helped identify that we are much more different than these streams can accommodate.